Frozen at sea

Freezing the fish right after it is caught helps preserve the fish, and maintains quality and freshness. This process requires large factories onboard the fishing vessels. Establishing a good relationship with the fishermen helps improve the level of freshness and product flow of these products.

Frozen at sea fillets

Frozen at sea fillets

The fish is caught, and the head and gut are removed. Next, the fish is cut in fillets. The skin might be removed, according to the consumers preferences (customized). The fillet is sorted into different sizes, before packed interleaved in carton and frozen in contact freezers. The fillets are frozen to -18° within max 3 hours and stored in -25°C. No artificial additives are used in the production onboard the vessel.

The following species are frozen at sea as filets:

COD - GADUS MORHUA
The cod is among the most important salt water fish and it can be found in large parts of the North Atlantic Ocean. The cod feed on other fish, crustaceans and plankton, and is a product full of proteins, vitamin B12 and selenium.

SAITHE - POLLACHIUS VIRENS
The saithe can gather in large packs where they find good nutrition, such as herring, fish fry, plankton and crustaceans. This is an excellent source of proteins, vitamin D, B12 and selenium.

HADDOCK - MALENOGRAMMUS AEGLEFINUS
The haddock is very recognizable due to its big black mark below its foremost dorsal fin. It lives on depths between 40 – 300 meters, and is a good source for proteins, vitamin A, B12 and selenium

Headed and gutted

Headed and gutted

The fish is caught and immediately headed and gutted. Next, the fish is graded before frozen in a vertical plate freezer. Frozen to -20° within max 3 hours and stored in -25°C. No artificial additives are used in the production onboard the vessel.
The following species are frozen headed and gutted:

 

COD – GADUS MORHUA
The cod is among the most important salt water fish and it can be found in large parts of the North Atlantic Ocean. The cod feed on other fish, crustaceans and plankton, and is a product full of proteins, vitamin B12 and selenium.

 

SAITHE – POLLACHIUS VIRENS
The saithe can gather in large packs where they find good nutrition, such as herring, fish fry, plankton and crustaceans. This is an excellent source of proteins, vitamin D, B12 and selenium.

 

HADDOCK – MALENOGRAMMUS AEGLEFINUS
The haddock is very recognizable due to its big black mark below its foremost dorsal fin. It lives on depths between 40 – 300 meters, and is a good source for proteins, vitamin A, B12 and selenium.

 

REDFISH –SEBASTES MARINUS / SEBASTES MANTELLA
The redfish is a deepwater specie, found in the North Atlantic. It is a good source of proteins, vitamin B12 and selenium.

 

HALIBUT – REINHARDTIUS HIPPOGLOSSOIDES
The halibut is a cold water fish – as is prefers cold waters. Its fat content varies throughout the season, but it is a good source of omega 3, proteins, vitamin D and selenium.

Headed and gutted
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    Fresh from the cold waters of the north